1) "Saaaay, this looks familiar": well, yeah; at least to begin with, this will be a straight transfer of a blog set up elsewhere. We just decided to move over here to tumblr with it
2) "Picture Thieves! You don't credit any reblogs!": We've been squirreling away images for years, before tumblr came rolling down the pike and everyone started getting their frillies in a tiswas over who owns what. Simple fact of the matter is we didn't keep a record of where we got most of the stuff from, so we can't doff our evil kleptomaniac caps accordingly. As mentioned above, this blog will start off a a straight transfer and so we won't be reblogging for a little while yet anyway. We'll always try to credit the artists / photographers responsible for the work, and when we catch up we'll acknowledge all reblogs for sure, just to keep all the anal retentives from busting a sphincter in sheer affronted indignation; but until then, you'll have to take us as you find us, or take a hike.
3) "Sinners! You call yourself a black & white blog?!?": well, no, actually, we don't. Black & white suits our aesthetic for a damn good whack of the time, but if occasionally we feel a little crimson flushing our hormone sluices, or fancy wantonly splattering a liberal wad of emerald in your eyes, then we'll damn well do it. Besides, black & grey never look so good as when set off just "so" by a primary accent, didn't you learn ANYTHING in fashion school dahlinks?
4) "So you don't wanna be an elite, or on the rise, or even a newcomer?": damn straight we don't. Who made this a race?
5) "It sounds like you have a chip on your shoulder": no, we don't. This is our blog is all.
dutotmartine:

black cat bone house. - hoodoothatvoodoo: Irina Ionesco sur We Heart It.

dutotmartine:

black cat bone house. - hoodoothatvoodoo: Irina Ionesco sur We Heart It.

Photo by Nina Leen for LIFE, 1950

Photo by Nina Leen for LIFE, 1950

lostsplendor:

Cigarette Card Starlets of the Jazz Age via The New York Public Library

"Cendrillon ou la pantoufle merveilleuse" - drawing by Georges Méliès (1912)
Collection Cinémathèque française Georges Méliès

"Cendrillon ou la pantoufle merveilleuse" - drawing by Georges Méliès (1912)

Collection Cinémathèque française Georges Méliès

Georges Méliès directing “Cendrillon”.
"Cinderella’ is the first of what early cinema historians have termed  Féeries (or fairy films), to distinguish them from the generally  shorter, less narrative-driven trick films, which Méliès and others also  made many of. Central to the fairy film is, of course, the fairy  godmother. She (played here, as with other such films, by Méliès’ lover  Jeanne d’Alcy) is the magician-director’s surrogate, creating the tricks  and manipulating the narrative. Subsequent Méliès Féeries would be more  polished and elaborate, including ‘Bluebeard’ (1901), ‘Kingdom of the  Fairies’ (1903) and, to an extent, ‘A Trip to the Moon’ (1902), although  it doesn’t feature a central fairy godmother. ‘Cinderella’, however, is  an important film landmark for getting these story films started."
(From IMDB: more here)

Georges Méliès directing “Cendrillon”.

"Cinderella’ is the first of what early cinema historians have termed Féeries (or fairy films), to distinguish them from the generally shorter, less narrative-driven trick films, which Méliès and others also made many of. Central to the fairy film is, of course, the fairy godmother. She (played here, as with other such films, by Méliès’ lover Jeanne d’Alcy) is the magician-director’s surrogate, creating the tricks and manipulating the narrative. Subsequent Méliès Féeries would be more polished and elaborate, including ‘Bluebeard’ (1901), ‘Kingdom of the Fairies’ (1903) and, to an extent, ‘A Trip to the Moon’ (1902), although it doesn’t feature a central fairy godmother. ‘Cinderella’, however, is an important film landmark for getting these story films started."

(From IMDB: more here)

Jeanne d’Alcy as the Fairy Godmother, and Barral as Cendrillon, in Méliès’ “Cendrillon” (“Cinderella”), 1899

Jeanne d’Alcy as the Fairy Godmother, and Barral as Cendrillon, in Méliès’ “Cendrillon” (“Cinderella”), 1899

Jehanne d’Alcy, favourite actress & lover of Georges Méliès

Jehanne d’Alcy, favourite actress & lover of Georges Méliès

Jehanne (Jeanne) d’Alcy in “The Astronomer’s Dream La Lune a un metre” (Méliès)

Jehanne (Jeanne) d’Alcy in “The Astronomer’s Dream La Lune a un metre” (Méliès)